AP Art History

Review of Islamic Architecture

Mosque Vocabulary Quizlet

Islamic Architecture from the APAH 250 in Chronological Order

183. The Kaaba. Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Islamic. Pre-Islamic monument; rededicated by Muhammad in 631–632 C.E.

185. Dome of the Rock. Jerusalem, Palestine. Islamic, Umayyad. 691–692 C.E.

186. Great Mosque (Masjid-e Jameh). Isfahan, Iran. c. 700 C.E.

56. Great Mosque. Córdoba, Spain. Umayyad. c. 785–786 C.E.

168. Great Mosque of Djenné. Mali. Founded c. 1200 C.E.; rebuilt 1906–1907

65. Alhambra. Granada, Spain. Nasrid Dynasty. 1354–1391 C.E.

84. Mosque of Selim II. Edirne, Turkey. Sinan (architect). 1568–1575 C.E.

209. Taj Mahal. Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India. 1632–1653 C.E.

 

183. The Kaaba. Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Islamic. Pre-Islamic monument; rededicated by Muhammad in 631–632 C.E.; multiple renovations. Granite masonry, covered with silk curtain and calligraphy in gold and silver-wrapped thread. holy-kaaba-pic%25255B3%25255D.jpg
timthumb.php the-kaaba-at-night.jpg

 

185. Dome of the Rock. Jerusalem, Palestine. Islamic, Umayyad. 691–692 C.E., with multiple renovations. Stone masonry and wooden roof decorated with glazed ceramic tile, mosaics, and gilt aluminum and bronze dome. dome_of_the_rock13235570190061.jpg
10.jpg 1280px-Israel-2013(2)-Aerial-Jerusalem-Temple_Mount-Temple_Mount_(south_exposure).jpg

       

186. Great Mosque (Masjid-e Jameh). Isfahan, Iran. Islamic, Persian: Seljuk, Il-Khanid, Timurid and Safavid Dynasties. c. 700 C.E.; additions and restorations in the 14th, 18th, and 20th centuries C.E. Stone, brick, wood, plaster, and glazed ceramic tile. 186_-_great_mosque_(masjid-e_jameh)__isfahan__iran__view_1-15150E123D626B144DB.jpg
5834044951_b9f617511d_b.jpg isfahan_plate_xii_3_emam_2.jpg

 

56. Great Mosque. Córdoba, Spain. Umayyad. c. 785–786 C.E. Stone masonry. interior-of-great-mosque-of-cordoba.jpg
mihrab bay.jpg cbceb96631f6777f2db20671a274e8647b499bd2.jpg
FLS1285.jpg

 

168. Great Mosque of Djenné. Mali. Founded c. 1200 C.E.; rebuilt 1906–1907. Adobe.

http://whc.unesco.org/pg.cfm?cid=31&l=en&id_site=116&gallery=1&&maxrows=27


 

11437575-14B57E34FD9151B4644.jpg
plan_dj.jpg c11936b00f3ed5d6bc0bef0397404f2fcd319a43.jpg

 

65. Alhambra. Granada, Spain. Nasrid Dynasty. 1354–1391 C.E. Whitewashed adobe stucco, wood, tile, paint, and gilding. 0901.jpg
alhambra.jpg Alhambra_Löwenhof_mit_Löwenbrunnen_2014.jpg


84. Mosque of Selim II. Edirne, Turkey. Sinan (architect). 1568–1575 C.E. Brick and stone. 13-20-14308E11F5D56170FD4.jpg
174a566a0d24e7d6ed9223ba9811029e375d789f.jpg 733e50467d354d9de6fee9dc3b8c732353753aee.jpg

 

209. Taj Mahal. Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India. Masons, marble workers, mosaicists, and decorators working under the supervision of Ustad Ahmad Lahori, architect of the emperor. 1632–1653 C.E. Stone masonry and marble with inlay of precious and semiprecious stones; gardens. Taj_Mahal_in_March_2004.jpg
taj_mahal_garden_sunrise.jpg IMG_4023.jpg
Taj_Mahal-10_(cropped).jpg

 

history-of-islamic-architecture-4-728.jpg

 

 

Facts about sacred spaces to be included in an essay:

  • What religion uses the space?

  • Where does the worship take place and what specific features are needed to accommodate religious beliefs and practices/worship/veneration of this religion? Use specific vocabulary for architectural features that accomodate beliefs. Review Mosque vocabulary

  • What specific architectural features or new technological advances allow the space to best accommodate religious practices, makes the space especially functional? Usually this means what type of building techniques are used to make this building so large in order to accomodate a lot of people. Use specific vocabulary. Review Mosque vocabulary

 

Review: Mosque Architecture on Khan Academy

 

001-mezquita-tiplogias-genericas.jpg

 

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updated June 25, 2017  April Lombardi